National Service Scheme

The Ministry of Education introduced the National Service Scheme during 1969. The choice of the timing of its introduction was remarkably auspicious as 1969 was the birth century year of Mahatma Gandhi, the Father of the Nation to whom service was almost a religion.

The symbol of the National Service Scheme, as appearing on the cover is based on the Rath wheel of the Konark Sun Temple of Orissa. These giant wheels of the Sun Temple portray the cycle of creation, preservation and release and signify the movement in life across time and space.

The Motto

The motto or watch word of the National Service Scheme is NOT ME BUT YOU.

History

After independence the University Grants Commission, headed by S. Radhakrishnan, recommended the introduction of voluntary national service in academic institutions. This idea was again considered by the Central Advisory Board of Education (CABE) at its meeting in January, 1950; after examining the idea and the experiences of other countries in this field, the board recommended that students and teachers should devote time to voluntary manual work. In the draft first Five-Year Plan adopted by the government in 1952, the need for social and labour service by Indian students for one year was stressed. In 1958 Jawaharlal Nehru, in a letter to the chief ministers, considered the idea of social service as a prerequisite for graduation. He directed the Ministry of Education to formulate a suitable scheme for the introduction of national service into academic institutions.

Symbol of NSS

The symbol for the NSS has been based on the giant Rath Wheel of the world famous Konark Sun Temple (The Black Pagoda) situated in Orissa, India. The wheel portrays the cycle of creation, preservation and release and signifies the movement in life across time and space, the symbol thus stands for continuity as well as change and implies the continuous striving of NSS for social change.The eight bars in the wheel represent the 24 hours of a day. The red colour indicates that the volunteer is full of young blood that is lively, active, energetic and full of high spirit. The navy blue colour indicates the cosmos of which the NSS is tiny part, ready to contribute its share for the welfare of the mankind.

Objectives

The broad objectives of NSS are to :

  • Understand the community in which they work;
  • Understand themselves in relation to their community
  • Identify the needs and problems of the community and involve them in problem solving process
  • Develop among themselves a sense of social and civic responsibility;
  • Utilize their knowledge in finding practical solution to individual and community problems
  • Develop competence required for group living and sharing of responsibilities
  • Gain skills in mobilizing community participation
  • Acquire leadership qualities and democratic attitude
  • Develop capacity to meet emergencies and natural disasters
  • Practice national integration and social harmony.